This blog is my journal in terms of med school. My name is Camille and I want to become a surgeon. If you have any questions, ask away, I'll happily reply! Much love.

Dr. Nina Starr Braunwald: The First Female Heart Surgeon

ascienceofuncertainty:

image

Drs. Nina Braunwald, far left and Andrew “Glenn” Morrow, far right, are shown performing heart valve surgery. (Source: NIH Library)

From her biography at Changing the Face of Medicine:

Nina Starr Braunnwald, M.D., was one of the first women to train as…

Tuesday, August 5, 2014
medicalschool:

Coronary Atherosclerosis
Many individuals who have been diagnosed with coronary atherosclerosis take medications to help hinder further progression of the disease. The class of drugs known as statins, which effectively reduce elevated cholesterol levels, have been especially useful in the battle against the condition and other forms of heart disease.

medicalschool:

Coronary Atherosclerosis

Many individuals who have been diagnosed with coronary atherosclerosis take medications to help hinder further progression of the disease. The class of drugs known as statins, which effectively reduce elevated cholesterol levels, have been especially useful in the battle against the condition and other forms of heart disease.

todayinhistory:

August 5th 1862: ‘Elephant Man’ born

On this day in 1862 Joseph Merrick, otherwise known as the ‘Elephant Man’, was born in Leicester. Merrick was an Englishman with severe facial and body deformities which resulted in him being exhibited as an ‘Elephant Man’. Treated poorly by his peers, Merrick eventually ended touring Europe as a ‘human curiosity’ and remained in a London Hospital for the rest of his life. Merrick died in 1890 aged 27 from asphyxiation, supposedly because he decided to sleep lying down (the weight of his head meant he had to sleep sitting up) in order to be like other people. His story became especially famous after the 1980 film about his life starring John Hurt as Merrick and Anthony Hopkins as his good friend Frederick Treves.

It is said he was suffering from Proteus syndrome. I met a patient suffering from it a week ago. Statistics say only about 500 people in the world suffer from it.

Monday, August 4, 2014
"The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago, the second best time is now"
Chienese proverb via humansofnewyork comment (via wertheyouth)

artu-me:

Aorta, stained with orsein + transverse section through a small artery and vein of the mucous membrane of the epiglottis(Gray’s Anatomy)

1/e. Tunica Intima
2/m. Tunica Media
3/a. Tunica Externa(Adventitia)

The tunicae of blood vessels are 3 layers: an inner, middle, and outer layer that are called, respectively, the tunica intima, the tunica media, and the tunica adventitia(externa).
The tunica intima (or just intima) is the innermost tunica (layer) of an artery or vein. It is made up of one layer of endothelial cells and is supported by an internal elastic lamina. The endothelial cells are in direct contact with the blood flow.
Tunica media is made up of smooth muscle cells and elastic tissue. It lies between the tunica intima on the inside and the tunica externa on the outside. The tunica media is distinguished from the tunica intima by its color and by the transverse arrangement of its fibers.
The tunica externa, also known as the tunica adventitia (or just adventitia), is the outermost tunica (layer) of a blood vessel, surrounding the tunica media. It is mainly composed of collagen and, in arteries, is supported by external elastic lamina. The collagen serves to anchor the blood vessel to nearby organs, giving it stability. 

uaortho:

Nerves dude. They’re a thing.

mymedlife:

Why do you think those two are hugging and crying? my resident asks as we watch our attending embrace a man about his age. It’s because one year ago that patient was given four months to live. I saw him then, he looked like he was on his deathbed.
No one knew what he had
But our attending figured it out. He diagnosed him.
It was a rare form of leukemia.
You know it’s rare when Google’s feeble attempts to help out only turns up a handful of journal articles.
Do you know how he knew?
He read an article about it a few weeks before. 
Everyone laughed at him, but he remembered that article and demanded we run the tests. 
Turns out, he was right.
Never forget, reading saves lives. 

To the first years, just staring out your med school journey, not sure why they signed up for this. To those who just finished boards, and never want to pick up a text book again. To the premeds, who just want to finish up their pre reqs and get to medical school already. To the spouses, who wonder if they will ever see their significant others without a textbook again.
This is why we do it.
This is why we stay up past our bedtimes.
And wake up before the sun.
This is why we memorize overly complicated pathways until we can do them in our sleep.
Why we can name every class of antibiotic, even those no one uses anymore.
This is why we push ourselves to be better every day than we were the last.
Why we put our lives on hold.
Not for more letters to put behind our name.
Not for some number on a score sheet.
Not because mom told us to.
We do it because one day, a day that will occur far faster than we are ready for, we’ll have our own patients.
One day someone will come in and ask you “so doc, what is it.” And you’ll say to yourself, I know this.

So when the tediousness of studying gets you down, don’t forget:
Reading saves lives.

mymedlife:

Why do you think those two are hugging and crying? my resident asks as we watch our attending embrace a man about his age. It’s because one year ago that patient was given four months to live. I saw him then, he looked like he was on his deathbed.

No one knew what he had

But our attending figured it out. He diagnosed him.

It was a rare form of leukemia.

You know it’s rare when Google’s feeble attempts to help out only turns up a handful of journal articles.

Do you know how he knew?

He read an article about it a few weeks before.

Everyone laughed at him, but he remembered that article and demanded we run the tests.

Turns out, he was right.

Never forget, reading saves lives.

To the first years, just staring out your med school journey, not sure why they signed up for this. To those who just finished boards, and never want to pick up a text book again. To the premeds, who just want to finish up their pre reqs and get to medical school already. To the spouses, who wonder if they will ever see their significant others without a textbook again.

This is why we do it.

This is why we stay up past our bedtimes.

And wake up before the sun.

This is why we memorize overly complicated pathways until we can do them in our sleep.

Why we can name every class of antibiotic, even those no one uses anymore.

This is why we push ourselves to be better every day than we were the last.

Why we put our lives on hold.

Not for more letters to put behind our name.

Not for some number on a score sheet.

Not because mom told us to.

We do it because one day, a day that will occur far faster than we are ready for, we’ll have our own patients.

One day someone will come in and ask you “so doc, what is it.” And you’ll say to yourself, I know this.

So when the tediousness of studying gets you down, don’t forget:

Reading saves lives.

jewsee-medicalstudent:

Ebola outbreak.

An ongoing epidemic of the Ebola virus disease has spread throughout Guinea and beyond the nation’s borders in West Africa. The outbreak, which began in Guinea in February 2014 and has spread to Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria, is the most severe in recorded history, both in the number of cases and fatalities. A suspected 1,323 cases with 729 deaths have been reported as of 27 July 2014, with 909 cases and 485 deaths confirmed to be Ebola.

But what is actually Ebola?

Ebola virus disease (EVD) or Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is the human disease caused by the ebola virus.

Ebola virus (formerly officially designated Zaire ebolavirus, or EBOV) is a virological taxon species included in the genus Ebolavirus, family Filoviridae. The Zaire ebolavirus is the most dangerous of the six species of Ebola viruses of the Ebolavirus genus which are the causative agents of Ebola virus disease and it is responsible of the outbreak.

Signs and symptoms: Manifestation begins with a sudden onset of an influenza-like stage characterized by general malaise, fever with chills, sore throat, severe headache, weakness, joint pain, muscle pain, and chest pain. The development of hemorrhagic symptoms is indicative of a negative prognosis. However, contrary to popular belief, hemorrhage does not lead to hypovolemia and is not the cause of death (total blood loss is low except during labor). Instead, death occurs due to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) due to fluid redistribution, hypotension, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and focal tissue necroses. 

Transmission: Ebola virus is transmitted to a human index case via contact with an infected animal’s bodily fluids. Human-to-human transmission occurs via direct contact with blood or bodily fluids from an infected person (including embalming of an infected dead person) or by contact with contaminated medical equipment, particularly needles and syringes. Medical workers who do not wear protective clothing, such as gloves and surgical masks, may also contract the disease.

Treatment: No ebolavirus-specific treatment exists. Treatment is primarily supportive in nature and includes minimizing invasive procedures, balancing fluids and electrolytes to counter dehydration, administration of anticoagulants early in infection to prevent or control disseminated intravascular coagulation, administration of procoagulants late in infection to control hemorrhaging, maintaining oxygen levels, pain management, and administration of antibiotics or antimycotics to treat secondary infections.

Sterilization procedures, isolating patients and good hygienic practices are the only way to prevent transmission.

 
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